Best Practices

Quick Tips to Reduce Stress and increase Wellness


Here are four actions you can take on a daily basis to reduce your team’s stress and burnout:


a. Stress can be contagious. Take care of yourself so your own stress level doesn’t negatively impact your staff.

b. Schedule more frequent check-ins with staff who seem particularly overwhelmed.


c. Help your team prioritize what needs to get done first, and what can be left for later.


d. Acknowledge staff members’ frustration with circumstances outside their control. Give them a safe place to vent beyond the earshot of patients and customers.

1. Individual Stress Assessment
Goal

This tool helps you identify how you typically cope with stress at work. It helps you become aware of your “default” stress reaction, so you can recognize it and react productively.

Manager Time Commitment

For self-assessment: 10 minutes
For team discussion: 20-30 minutes

Staff Time Commitment

For self-assessment: 10 minutes
For team discussion: 20-30 minutes

How to use this tool

1. Complete the Individual Stress Assessment on the next page.
This exercise works best if you are honest with yourself. The answers are just for you.

2. Consider sharing the assessment with your team during a staff meeting.
Talking points:

a. Explain that we are predisposed to react to stress in a particular way. Identifying your default stress reaction is helpful, because you can then learn tactics that help you react productively to stress.
b. Decide on a deadline to complete the self-assessment (in additional resources)
c. Tell staff to bring their completed self-assessment to your next team meeting, where you'll discuss your stress responses (but staff will be welcome to share as much - or as little - as they like)

3. Lead a brief discussion about the stress assessment results at your next team meeting.
Use the following questions to prompt discussion among your staff:
• Was there one particular stress reaction that you read and thought, “Yes, that sounds exactly like me!”? Which one?
• What was your dominant stress response? Were you surprised to learn this about yourself?
• As you read though the tactics that correspond to your dominant stress response, is there one you are going to commit to trying? Have you found there are other tactics that effectively help you deal with your stress?


Don’t push staff to share their answers if they’d prefer to keep them private.

Additional Resources

2. Meeting Etiquette Reminders
Goal

This tool helps you avoid hosting unproductive meetings to ensure you are protecting your time and your staff’s time.

Manager Time Commitment

To review: 10 minutes

Staff Time Commitment

None

How to use this tool

1. Review the “Anatomy of a Great Meeting" Infographic (in additional resources) and apply the principles as you lead meetings with your staff.


2. Print the infographic and hang a copy in each regular meeting room to help remind you and your team about the principles of effective management.

3. Hang a clock in every regular meeting room to help everyone keep track of time.

Additional Resources

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